Posts Tagged: talk to me

Why Old Books Deserve 340% More Attention From You

November 2, 2017 books, discussion 14

talk to me graphic reviews and cake

Talk to Me is an irregular discussion feature on this blog. It’s pretty much exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to tell you my opinion, and then I’m handing over to you, so you can let me know what you think in the comments.

Topic

Old books! Or should I say vintage books? Is that sexier? I haven’t even written the introduction and I’m already getting distracted, an autobiography by me. Let’s try this again. In the book blogging community we often focus on new releases. It makes sense – many bloggers (myself included) review ARCs, publishers push new releases, there’s a lot of hype around recent books and, most importantly, NEW STUFF IS SHINY. But what about older books? I’m not talking classics, which at least get some attention, but books from ten or twenty years ago (quick reminder, twenty years ago means 1997, what the hell). Do they really deserve less of our attention? Why do we forget about older books so easily?

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Books About Twenty-Somethings

July 3, 2017 books, discussion 8

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

We all know about the omnipresence of Young Adult books. Books about characters in their teens hold a certain appeal, perhaps because we learn a lot about who we are and who we want to be at that stage in life. But where are the books about twenty-somethings? I’m in my early twenties, and I’ve been desperately looking for good books featuring characters my age. Obviously they exist, but I feel like they are few and far between. Maybe it’s just me, but I’m finding it much more difficult to find books about people in their twenties than YA or adult books. I was shortly excited when New Adult emerged as a category, but then I realised New Adult mostly seems to be erotica (nothing wrong with that obviously, but not quite what I had in mind). So where are all the books about people my age? Some of the ‘older’ YA books, like Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, focus on people going off to university, but they are few and far between.
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Do You Use Your Blog For Job Applications?

February 24, 2016 discussion 12

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

Everyone who runs a blog, no matter how big or small, knows that a lot of work, time and discipline goes into it. Depending on your blogging style and your niche, you’ll have to at least think about the following points to varying degrees:

  • content production: how often do you post what, how polished does it need to be and when do you have the time to actually write it?
  • social media presence and marketing: do I need to get pinterest even though I’m more comfortable on twitter? Does it make sense to create a facebook page for my blog? Will people actually follow me? Whether we play the social media game or not you win or you die; there is no middle ground, most bloggers have thought about this at one point or another and a lot of bloggers spend huge chunks of time devoted to their social media presence.
  • platform: should I go self-hosted or use an existing platform? If I go self-hosted, how much do I have to pay? Should I learn some code myself, or should I dish out for a customized theme? Do I need to know Photoshop to make a blog banner? Can I just use a free theme?
  • networking: how much time do I have to reply to comments and comment back? Can I approach bloggers who have a bigger following than I do without making a fool of myself, or will they think I’m a total dork?

These are just a few of the points that can face you when you run a blog. Of course it is always your decision how much time you put into your blog, but creating and maintaining a blog consistently takes a lot of discipline and creativity. It can, however contain personal information, informal writing, or controversial opinions, which is why I’m interested: do you put your blog on your CV if you have one, and if you don’t, would you put it on your CV if you had a blog?
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You’re Not Even Prepared

February 7, 2016 miscellaneous 16

Cake Conversations Banner Kopie - Kopie

What’s New?

Goooood day, blogglings. I have been informed that I said I’d be back in February and it is now one week into the month without a post from me. All I have to say to that is well… yes, BUT I never said I’d be back on the first of the month, so it’s really not my fault if you don’t read the fine print.There was no fine print. Also, when am I ever early to something, give me a break. One week is still fashionably late. Now two weeks, that would have been rude. To make up for the fact that you had to live without me, I decided the best way to celebrate my reappearance would be with some baking pictures. Never let it be said that I don’t put the cake in Reviews and Cake. Sometimes. But first things first.



I’d ask what you’ve all been up to, but obviously you can’t answer me now, so there’d be an awkward pause, kind of like when you send someone a recorded message on whatsapp and ask them a question before you realize they can’t reply and then you have to keep speaking as if you weren’t just expecting an answer. Just me? Ah, well. I’ll tell you what I’ve been up to in the last month then. Brace yourselves; it’s an exciting list. Many adventures were had.
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Do You Review A Lot of Books You Didn’t Like On Your Blog?

December 17, 2015 books, discussion 26

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.




Topic

Bloggers, I have a question for you! Recently, I realized I mainly review books, movies and TV shows that I liked, so there’s a much higher percentage of favorable reviews on my blog. Naturally, I was wondering if you do the same, or if I should make more of an effort to share negative reviews as well.
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How Often Should I Post?

December 8, 2015 discussion, miscellaneous 8

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

There’s a lot of blogging advice out there when you look for it, and I usually ignore most of it, but this has me stumped. How often should I post? To be honest, I usually just do as I please, which means that sometimes there are 7 posts a week (okay, admittedly not that often) and sometimes there aren’t any for three weeks. I think it’s important not to get stressed about it when it’s a hobby, because it should be fun, but I do get itchy when I haven’t posted something in a while. I agree with most advice out there that it’s important to be somewhat consistent, but that still leaves the question of frequency.
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Are We Targeting The Wrong Audience?

November 24, 2015 discussion 16

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

This post is inspired by a discussion about why reviews receive less comments than other posts on These Paper Hearts. In it, Stephanie raises the question of whether we are too focused on catering to fellow bloggers instead of readers who don’t have a blog themselves. As this is something I’ve been thinking about myself, I thought I’d start a discussion.

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Gendered Books

July 31, 2015 books, discussion 20

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

I went to the bookstore yesterday. Now usually this would be a celebratory experience. And it still was (yay, new books!), but while I was there I found something that irked me. Irked me quite a lot that is. So naturally I had to share it with you.

Standing before the English section (because obviously I can’t be bothered to read books in my first language, that would be ridiculous), I saw a book that sparked my interest. It was called “End of Time” and – thinking it might somehow be related to Doctor Who – I pulled it out to take a closer look. It turned out not to be Doctor Who related at all, but a German/English mixed-language book for English learners. Which is an awesome concept. EXCEPT. Right there on the cover it said “Boy Zone”. Apparently it was mainly targeted at teenage boys. I remember similar marketing concepts from my childhood, books mainly targeted at girls that were mostly about first love and growing up.

My Opinion

Now I know a lot of products are randomly and unnecessarily gendered. But given the role books have played in my life, gendering books just seems like a bit of a personal insult to me. I understand that marketing theory can’t stress the role of defining target groups enough, but for fuck’s sake people. I don’t believe in binary genders, and I’m of the opinion that gender is mainly socially constructed (of which this is a prime example really), but let’s just for a moment neglect that debate. Why the fuck is scifi only for boys? Why is there a “chick lit” genre? Why the hell can’t we all just accept that stories are stories and can be enjoyed by all genders alike? Yes, I’m aware that you can just buy the book anyway, but I’m operating under the assumption that a lot of people wouldn’t, especially teenagers who tend to be more insecure of their identity and self-worth and would often be sujected to bullying.

In the case of this book, there is a clear label on the cover defining it as a book for boys, but often the label is in our minds. If you show someone The Princess Diaries and Maze Runner, there’s no doubt which one would be considered more of a girl’s and which one would be considered more of a boy’s book. It’s just absurd to me that we’d limit good stories this way. It’s like saying Harry Potter can only be enjoyed by children or YA literature holds no worth for people who are older than the target group. A great story is a great story and a shitty story is a shitty story. C.S. Lewis said “A children’s story that can only be enjoyed by children is not a good children’s story in the slightest.” Similarly, a story that can only be enjoyed by one gender is not a good story. It also doesn’t exist, because the problem doesn’t lie with the story, it lies with society’s understanding of for whom it is acceptable to read it.

I know that this is a well-known and frequently discussed problem, but evidently it’s still a problem. It extends far beyond books – I’m often perplexed when I watch a movie and someone comments it’s a movie for men rather than women, because there’s action in it or it doesn’t primarily focus on romance. A lot of the time the thought never even occured to me. I feel inadequate when I’m more interested in a game night than watching Sex and the City. And I’m not saying I don’t enjoy things targeted at women. I absolutely do. I just don’t exclusively enjoy them, and I think that is true for everyone. “Educating” people that it’s more acceptable for one gender than another to like certain kinds of stories or do certain kinds of things makes me incredibly sad, because a lot of people will miss out on great books and experiences or feel ashamed that they’re enjoying them. It also simply just pissed me off, and writing is my tool to deal with my emotions, so there ya go.

Your Turn!

What’s your take on this? Do you think it’s okay to gender products in the interest of marketing and sales, or do you think it’s unnecessary? Have you come across gendered books before?

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Talk to Me: How many blogs do you really follow?

February 20, 2015 discussion 8

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

Let’s start the weekend off with a discussion! Today’s topic is about how many people you can realistically follow and the time you decide that you want to follow them and where. When I look at other people’s twitter profiles and see they’re following thousands of people, I often find myself wondering how many people they ACTUALLY follow (as in: read their blog posts and maybe interact in some way). I’m pretty sure no one’s able to actually keep up with a twitter or bloglovin’ feed that encompasses 2000 people, but I do wonder: how many people can you actually, realistically follow closely?

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Talk to Me: Blogging Communities

February 9, 2015 books, discussion, movies 10

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

Today’s post is about different blogging communities! Okay, so if you follow this blog or have stumbled upon it before, you might have noticed that, while I mostly post about books, I also post about movies and random stuff I like. If I’ve posted about something that is not book related several times in a row, I wonder whether I can still say I’m a book blogger. It doesn’t really make much of a difference, but since I feel most at home in the book blogging community, it’s worth consideration to me. I think I do consider myself a book blogger, but who says you only have to be one thing? Which brings me to my actual question: What kinds of blogging communities are there? And do most people just keep to one of them, or are they part of different communities?

Read more »

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Talk to Me: Commenting Back

January 20, 2015 discussion 12

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link it in the comments.


Topic

A community is only a community when people interact with each other. In the blogging world, this mostly happens through commenting, link ups, and interaction on social media. Most of the time, the people who comment on posts have a blog of their own. If you’re a blogger yourself, you’re probably aware that some bloggers make it their mission to not only reply to every comment they get, but to also check out their commenters’ blogs (if they have one) to comment on THEIR posts. Other bloggers may never reply, or only reply when they feel they have something insightful to say, and they don’t often – or never – take a look at their commenters’ blog posts. Since bloggers can have vastly different priorities, I thought it would be interesting to see what you guys have to say about commenting back!
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Talk To Me: Followers and Give-Aways

December 17, 2014 books, discussion 8

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to pose a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it! Obviously feel free to write up your own post on the topic and link me up.


Topic

FOLLOW MEEE! Give-aways are almost ubiquitous in the (book) blogging scene. In a lot of give-aways, you have to follow the blogger on various social media sites to have decent chances of winning. Sometimes there’s a free entry, but if there are ten more possible entries, you’ll probably want to enhance your chance of winning that cool book you’ve been waiting for for ages. But do you stay subscribed or unsubscribe when the give-away is over? Are give-aways worth it in the long run – for bloggers and for subscribers?
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Talk To Me: Romance Novel Heroes

November 24, 2014 books, discussion 4

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense discussion feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to ask you a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it!


Topic

As I previously mentioned I just had to give a presentation on the representation of the male romance novel hero at university, so I thought why not take it to the blog! My presentation was based on a chapter from the Smart Bitches‘ Guide to Romance (hilarious book, I highly recommend it) and an academic essay on male virgins in romance novels. Basically, I talked about the stereotypes of romance novel heroes and how they have changed over time. I’m pretty sure we’ve all read a book with a controlling, dominant alpha hero, who is naturally the most handsome guy around (or if he has competition, he just has that extra something that gives him an edge) and is competent at everything but stepping the macho behavior down a notch. So… good and entertaining or stupid and sexist?

My Opinion

Personally, I fall into the category that would say good and entertaining AND stupid and sexist. I can’t speak for everyone, but even though it doesn’t always work for me (there’s a fine line between I-had-a-tragic-childhood-and-that’s-why-I’m-a-jerk-but-I-will-change-for-you and I’m-just-a-jerk-and-all-my-excuses-are-stupid), I have read a lot of novels like this and liked them. I think the same concepts would probably apply to same-sex relationships if one is always portrayed as the more dominant and controlling one (although there is probably a different history of stereotypes and portrayal), but it would be interesting to think about how that might or might not change the dynamic.

If I recall correctly, one of the points the Smart Bitches’ Guide made (yes, I did choose the presentation topic because I saw that title on the reading list) was that one shouldn’t underestimate the reader – we’re aware it’s a fantasy and don’t necessarily want our partner to behave like that in real life, but sometimes the fantasy is nice. The book also talked about how the male role has changed over the years due to the fact that heroines are now often in control of their lives without needing the hero to save them, so the hero can be a more interesting character because he gets to do more than swoop down and save the damsel in distress.

So I guess I don’t always mind the macho behavior, as long as the heroine is not completely dependent on her love interest and can support herself and kick ass all on her own. To be more precise, I don’t mind it as long as it’s more showing off than really acting like an overbearing jerk. I do appreciate a more realistic portrayal of men (or, you know, people in general), and I think it would be much more interesting to read about more diverse and complex characters. To be honest though, I have a MUCH higher tolerance for jerk-y behavior in books than I do in real life. Would I approve of a friend’s relationship with a guy who killed several people, werewolf or not, in real life (yes, the werewolf hypothesis still holds up in this scenario)? Proooobably not, but it’s not like I’m going to throw my book across the room when the hero kills off all the bad guys either.

Your Turn!

So, what’s your take on romance heroes? Are you into controlling alpha males in books, or do they just plain annoy you?

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Talk To Me: Blogging and Stress

November 1, 2014 discussion 4

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to ask you a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it!


Topic

I’ve been wanting to talk about this for a while now and this recent post prompted me to finally write up my opinion on blogging and stress. If you’re reading even just a couple of (book) blogs, you’ll have read things like “I’m sooo behind on my ARCs” or “I’ve only blogged twice this week even though I wanted to blog every day” and so on and so forth. It seems like a lot of people deal with stress related to blogging.

My Opinion

It stresses me out just reading those things! And I mean that literally, I’ll start comparing myself and my blog and feel inadequate for a few minutes until I remind myself of what actually matters to me. I’m not judging anyone because if I started requesting ARCs, I’d get worried about not being able to stay on top of my reading list too. I also understand why it’s so important to post regularly if you have a lot of readers you don’t want to disappoint, or if you want to build your audience or even just because of a goal you set for yourself. I do also get itchy when I haven’t posted in a while. Honestly though? I blog because I love it. I don’t care to make it a competition. I’ve read like 30 books this year and you know what? With that I already surpassed my own goal and I really couldn’t care less if that’s 200 books less than someone else read. I read because I enjoy it (or because I have to for uni) and I blog because I enjoy it.

I downloaded an ebook from NetGalley once in the Read Now section and was stressed out about abandoning it for about a day before I realized I don’t even want ARCs because I don’t want to feel obligated to someone. I think accepting books for review consideration instead of for review is a great idea, and I adamantly refuse to do any sort of weekly feature because I know the pressure of things like that would take the fun out of blogging for me. Instead what you get with me are rambly posts, I’ll-do-it-when-I-feel-like-it-features and an irregular posting schedule. I’m obviously not saying everyone should follow my example – I like some weekly features on other blogs and I love when my favorite blogs are updated regularly. However, I do wish there was less comparing and feeling stressed and more chilling the eff out.

Your Turn!

So, what’s your opinion on this? Are you deeply offended by what I just said, or have you had similar thoughts? And please tell me I’m not the only one who feels stressed when she reads about other people’s stress!

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Talk To Me: Authors and Social Media

October 21, 2014 books, discussion 2

Talk To Me

is a no-nonsense feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to ask you a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it!

Topic

AUTHOR ALERT! AUTHOR ALERT! …is what goes off in my head every time an author replies to me/favorites a tweet/comments on a post of mine. Theoretically, I knew social media give everyone a chance to connect better, but it was only when I got into this blogging thing that I really realized what that means. I’m not really someone who tends to be startstruck by anyone, but let’s be honest – it does kind of give you a kick when someone whose work you admire acknowledges your existence.

My Opinion

As with everything there are two sides to this. I think it’s amazing that writers, performers – basically anyone who has a fan or two or two million – can connect and interact with the people that love their work. This usually benefits both sides enormously. BUT, and you knew there was a but coming, it does make me think more about what I say and how I say it. That alone is not necessarily a bad thing, but there is such a thing as thinking TOO much about it. I think it’s important to remember that reviewers are criticizing the work and not the maker behind it (unless they’re jerks), but I generally believe in being respectful in my reviews. I do however make exceptions sometimes: If I really hated something, I might be tempted into a rant and, if they hit my kind of humor, I like reading bad reviews from time to time. Oops.

Naturally I don’t like everything I read or watch. Even when I really liked something there will probably be things that could have been improved. Let alone the times I DIDN’T like something. Does the fact that the person who created whatever I’m criticizing might see my review make me change the content of my post? No, I like to think it doesn’t, but sometimes I have to really force myself to leave things in. My blog is TINY in comparison with others and this has already happened a couple of times, so I can imagine this can get stressful for some people who accept review requests from authors who personally send them their books, especially if they know and like the author.

All of that doesn’t mean I don’t want authors (or whoever else) to see my posts or to connect on social media. Quite the opposite – 99.9 percent of the time it’s AMAZING. I do think this could be stressful the other 0.1 percent though, and I’m wondering how people who are under a lot more pressure due to a bigger audience or a personal relationship with the author handle this.

Your Turn!

What do you think? Is it part of the job description to deal with rants and disrespectful people when you’re a creator or should people be respectful at all times? Have you ever changed a review or a post because you didn’t want to hurt someone’s feelings? If you’re an author, how do you deal with bad reviews?

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Talk To Me: E-Mail Subscriptions

October 12, 2014 discussion 4

Talk To Me

is a new no-nonsense feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to ask you a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it!

Topic

Subscriptions!

When I started this blog, I hadn’t really been following any blogs regularly and, once I created it and started posting, I was faced with the same problem every newbie blogger is faced with: how do I announce my presence to the rest of the world? How are people supposed to find my blog? I felt like I was shouting into the endless depths of the internet with no echo to speak of. I quickly discovered that there is a community within the world of (book) bloggers and things became a little easier. I added ways to subscribe to my blog and finally created a twitter account I actually use.

A lot of people use sites created solely for the purpose of keeping up with their favorite blogs like bloglovin or pinterest, whereas others are more comfortable with social media designed for a broader range of possibilities like twitter or facebook. From what I’ve observed, twitter seems to be more popular within the blogging community, and Jessi at Novel Heartbeat recently wondered whether facebook pages are actually useful, but a lot of blogs still have them anyway. If you’re using wordpress.com you already have a built-in community you can take advantage of (one of the only things I’ve been missing since switching to wordpress.org), and I assume the same is true for blogger. The real reason I am writing this post, however, are e-mail subscriptions.

I hate to say it, but I DEEPLY distrust every e-mail I get that informs me of a new registration to my blog because I always wonder whether it’s a real person or a spambot. Judging by the e-mail adresses some definitely are spam, but I don’t want to go randomly deleting people in case some of them are actual e-mail subscribers. Which, you know, I’d be very happy about. I’ve had some weird e-mail addresses in my life, no judgement. But are there really a lot of people who follow blogs via e-mail?

My Opinion

I recently stopped using bloglovin and now subscribe to blogs via e-mail or twitter or both. At first I thought bloglovin was a great idea and I haven’t deleted my account, but the app wasn’t really doing it for me. I didn’t like that I can’t comment on posts or see others’ comments within the app, or that posts disappear from my feed once I’ve read them. Sometimes it seemed like it took a couple of hours for new posts to show up as well.

I never really considered following blogs via e-mail an option because I thought it would be unnecessarily complicated to receive an e-mail and then log on to my computer to actually read the post. Now I follow blogs I like on twitter AND subscribe to my favorite ones via e-mail. I like that I can actually read the blog post within the e-mail and then check it out later. If the subject of the post isn’t for me I can just delete the e-mail, no harm done. Keeping up with folks on twitter is also fun because you don’t get to just see the posts, but share interesting articles or fun pics. Or, you know, stalk your favorite celebrities and authors, whichever. Apart from the fact there’s an unreasonable amount of cat and baby pictures, I’m starting to really like this totally new thing that none of you knew about before I pointed it out in this post.

Your Turn!

What’s your favorite way to subscribe to blogs? Which options do you offer on your own blog if you have one? And, most importantly because I haven’t found a way myself yet: how the eff do you filter spambots from your e-mail subscription list without deleting people who are ACTUALLY interested in your content?

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Talk To Me: Are Translations Important?

September 19, 2014 books, discussion 3

This post is inspired by a BBC article on why English speakers won’t read books in translation.

Talk to Me

is a new no-nonsense feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to ask you a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it!

Topic

When I was younger, I never really cared whether a book was a translation – unless I had to wait for the next book in a series because it had to be translated before I could read it. Other than that, the main criterion that decided whether I would read a book was, of course, always the story. To be honest, I never even thought about the subject that much until I read the above linked article. The author of it wonders why literatures from other languages make up so little of the English-language publishers’ output and it got me thinking. I almost exclusively read books written in English these days, and I read them in the original because I can, because I like it and because I don’t trust the translation. Before I was able to do this, however, I was already an avid reader. When I think back to my childhood, I’m pretty sure that the majority of the books I read were translations from English, so I never really thought about the fact that this could be different in other countries.

Read more »

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Talk to Me: Commenting on Old Posts

September 4, 2014 discussion 10

Talk to Me

is a new no-nonsense feature on this blog. No-nonsense means I’m too lazy to make it look pretty. It’s exactly what the title suggests: I’m going to ask you a question or tell you my own opinion about something, and I want to know what you think about it!

Topic

While reading other blogs, I have noticed that often I scroll down, see an interesting post, think about commenting and then… don’t. Not because I suddenly realized that I don’t find it interesting anymore or because I’ve run out of time, but because I saw it’s been a while since the entry has been posted and I think my comment is “too late” somehow.

Opinion

Now on my own blog I love comments, no matter on which posts. Granted, it’s still a baby blog, but I don’t think I’ll feel about this any differently once I’ve been posting for a while. I’m sharing my thoughts because I love to write it all down and communicate with someone else, so I’m always happy when someone comments (unless it’s spam obviously). However, whenever I’m reading another blog, I find myself unwilling to comment when the post is even a few days old – especially when other things have been posted in between. Somehow I must think that my comment wouldn’t be relevant anymore because it’s already “old news”. And that’s just if the post is a few days old; let’s not even talk about months or years. Lately, I’ve been trying to get over that and just comment if I have something to say if the post is reasonably recent (yay alliteration).

Question

So, whatch’all think? Do you do this too? Do you think it makes sense or should people feel free to comment on posts no matter how old they are? If you have your own blog: how do you feel about comments on old posts? Are you happy about them, or have you already forgotten what the heck you were going on about back then?

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